Room to rent advert is so ‘chaotic’ people don’t even know where to start

Social media users are going wild over a fake room to rent advert uploaded to the Facebook group, Hackney Wick Spaces.

The ad claims to offer a double bedroom in an old children’s indoor play area for £950 per month.

There’s so much going on in the post that those who spotted it say they didn’t know where to start with it.

It reads: “Double room available in the old Wacky Warehouse in Dalston. You’ll be sharing with five other creatives aged 24-35, four of us are working and the other a mature student studying desairology.

“The room is newly carpeted with two fully openable windows. Available from late November. Pm for details.”

Alongside this, they shared five photos supposedly of the warehouse home, but which seem to have been collected from a range of different sources.

While there is no Wacky Warehouse in Dalston, you might be pleased to learn that the images featuring the play area are actually real and are of a holiday home in Westbourne called Lollipops, which is a converted church hall with its own indoor soft play.

Meanwhile the bedroom shot was taken from a 2017 article about the messiest bedrooms in the UK.

Despite this, many people seem to have been duped by the amusing advert since it has gone viral.

One person replied: “The most Dalston thing ever. Why have they laid a fake breakfast table but not tidied the stinking bedroom?”

“I can’t believe they didn’t tidy the bedroom for the photo,” proclaimed a second.

Others just didn’t know what to think about the whole thing.

Someone else commented: “I’ve read this so many times, I don’t even know where to begin…”

Another said: “These photos hold extremely chaotic energy.”

A different user agreed, branding the property “chaos”, while a sixth thought it looked like the setting for a Netflix true crime show.

Some were too distracted by the subject of ‘desairology’ mentioned within the post after looking up what it was.

One person tweeted: “Desairology is the practice of caring for hair and nails of decedents in a funeral home by desairologists, who are cosmetologists or barber stylists. Desairology is a product of the practice of viewing a deceased person in their open casket prior to burial.”

They added it was “a lot to unpack”.